Management of spruce-fir in even-aged stands in the central Rocky Mountains by Robert R. Alexander

Cover of: Management of spruce-fir in even-aged stands in the central Rocky Mountains | Robert R. Alexander

Published by Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Fort Collins, Colo .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Forest management -- Rocky Mountains,
  • Spruce,
  • Fir,
  • Trees -- Growth

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementRobert R. Alexander and Carleton B. Edminster.
SeriesResearch paper RM -- 217.
ContributionsEdminster, Carleton B., Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)
The Physical Object
Pagination[2], 14 p. :
Number of Pages14
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17616904M
OCLC/WorldCa9963489

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Title. Management of spruce-fir in even-aged stands in the central Rocky Mountains / Related Titles. Series: Research paper RM, By. Alexander, Robert R.

Edminster, Carleton B. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.) Type. Management of spruce-fir in even-aged stands in the central Rocky Mountains. Fort Collins, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type.

Management of spruce-fir in even-aged stands in the central Rocky Mountains. Fort Collins, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) The spruce-fir type is widespread in the central and southern Rocky Mountains. It is found in the high mountains of north­ western and north-central Wyoming, and south through Colo­ rado to southern New Mexieo and Arizona (fig.

The type also occurs in the Rocky Mountains from southwestern Al­. Yield tables for managed even-aged stands of spruce-fir in the central Rocky Mountains / Related Titles. Series: USDA Forest Service research paper RM ; By. Alexander, Robert R. Shepperd, Wayne D.

Edminster, Carleton B. Type. Book. Base-age invariant polymorphic site index curves for even-aged spruce-fir stands in Maine / (Orono, Me.: University of Maine at Orono, Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, ), by Bret Potter Vicary, Ralph H.

Griffin, Thomas B. Brann, and Maine Agricultural Experiment Station (page images at HathiTrust). Lodgepole pine forests interspersed with stands of quaking aspens are fire-resilient forests that dominate the central and north-central Rocky Mountains.

Usually found between 2, and 3, metres (8, ft) in Colorado, lodgepole pines and aspens grow rapidly after fire in mostly even-aged stands. In the Canadian Rockies, the lodgepole pine/quaking aspen forests. The FEF is located in the subalpine forest zone of the central Rocky Mountains, with elevations ranging from m to about m at treeline.

This. Spruce beetle outbreaks have been reported in the Rocky Mountains of western North America since the late s. In their classic paper, Spruce Beetle in the Rockies, Schmid and Frye reviewed the literature that emerged from the extensive outbreaks in Colorado in the s.

A new wave of outbreaks has affected Rocky Mountain subalpine spruce-fir forests beginning in Cited by: Alexander, Robert R. Silvicultural systems and cutting methods for old-growth spruce-fir forests in the central and southern Rocky Mountains.

Gen. Tech. Rep. RM Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 33 p. [] 9. Alexander, Robert R. James N.

Long USU Lab Website. WHO WE ARE The Forest Ecology and Silviculture lab is located in the College of Natural Resources at Utah State University in Logan, Utah USA.

Alexander, Robert R. Silvicultural systems and cutting methods for old-growth spruce-fir forests in the central and southern Rocky Mountains.

Gen. Tech. Rep. RM Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 33 p. [] 4. Alexander, Robert R.

Management of spruce-fir in even-aged stands in the Central Rocky Mountains. Book. Jan ; Wayne T. Swank in the central Rocky Mountains under various combinations of. Descriptions are given of age class distribution, reaction to competition and disturbance, stand conditions, effects of wind, pests, diseases, fire and animals, and cutting history in natural stands of Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa.

Guidelines are presented for even-aged or uneven-aged harvesting practices for conversion of the old-growth forests into managed by: 9. carbon sequestration in southern Appalachian spruce-fir forests. Forests 3(2) DeRose, R.J. and J.N. Long Drought-driven disturbance history characterizes a southern Rocky Mountain subalpine forest.

Canadian Journal of Forest Research Long, J.N. and J.D. Shaw. A density management diagram for even-aged Sierra. Full text of "Silvicultural systems and cutting methods for old-growth lodgepole pine forests in the Central Rocky Mountains" See other formats.

Wadleigh and Jenkins () reported that surface fire was common during the stand-replacing fire interval in the central Rocky Mountains.

Jenkins et al. () evaluated the influence of surface fire on successional patterns in subalpine spruce-fir forests in northern by: Recently thinned stand of western larch- An even-aged stand of western larch (tamarack to Idaho lumbermen) just thinned. Tending operations, including thinning of western larch monocultures, were explained below in the section, Silvicultural Systems in the Northern Rocky Mountains Mixed Conifer Forest.

Within the Central Rocky Mountains, spruce beetle populations have the potential to rapidly transition from endemic to epidemic levels in the spruce-fir (Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir) forest type. Conventional management has focused on creating resistance to spruce beetle outbreaks by manipulating the overstory density and composition.

Picea glauca, the white spruce, is a species of spruce native to the northern temperate and boreal forests in North America. Picea glauca was originally native from central Alaska all through the east, across southern/central Canada to the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland.

It now has become naturalized southward into the far northern United States border states like Montana, Clade: Tracheophytes. Alexander RR, Edminster CB () Management of spruce-fir in even-aged stands in the Central Rocky Mountains.

Research Paper RM, USDA Forest Service Google Scholar Alexander RR, Edminster CB () Management of lodgepole pine in even-aged stands in the Central Rocky : Gerald J.

Gottfried, Peter F. Ffolliott, Kenneth N. Brooks, Randall K. Kolka, Carol B. Raish, Daniel. This chapter provides an overview regarding the lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Loudon) from the perspective of its ecological demands and the possibilities of its silvicultural utilization in Central European conditions.

Described are its natural habitat, variability, ecological properties, and the environmental demands (natural mixtures, geological needs, soil, Author: Petr Novotný, Martin Fulín, Jiří Čáp, Jaroslav Dostál. Development of management techniques that allowed for stand development to be monitored and guided into sustainable paths were in part a response to past experience, particularly in Central European countries, of the negative effects of pure, uniform stands with species often unsuited to the site, which greatly increased the risk of soil.

Coordinator, Continuing Education in Ecosystem Management (CEEM) for the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain West. Associated Editor, Western Journal Applied Forestry () Member, Editorial Board, Forest Ecology and Management () Author of >90 peer reviewed journal papers and book chapters.

Rangeland improvement through seeding and weed control on east slope Sierra Nevada and on southern Cascade Mountains. () AH Rating spruce-fir stands for spruce budworm damage in eastern North America. () AH Rating the risk of tussock moth defoliation using aerial photographs. () AH The effects of clearcutting on stream temperature: a literature review / (Olympia, Wash.: Forest Land Management Center, Dept.

of Natural Resources, ), by Harry William Anderson and Washington (State). Department of Natural Resources. Rocky Mountains, Southern Rocky Mountains, Great Lakes, and Northeast (Fig.

Lynx geographic areas do not represent distinct lynx populations, or isolated subpopulations, or even currently occupied habitat. Each has unique ecosystems and management histories. Within these areas (refer to list of. Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook.

If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF.

More tree cover, more pine duff, and more bluegrass- An even-aged lodgepole pine forest range with relative high tree density and crown cover in the Southern Rocky Mountains. On more open portions of this forest (including both small parks and local stands of wider tree spacings) the understorey included both a shrub and an herbaceous layer.

This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Introduction. Fire, insects, and diseases are natural, integrated components of western forests in North America (Martin, ; Harvey, ).The recurring disturbances they cause are essential to creating and maintaining these forests (Hessburg et al., ).The combined effects of fire, competition for light and water, and native forest insects and pathogens have interacted for Cited by: The extensive literature on natural disturbance in forests is reviewed in terms of the hypotheses: (1) that disturbance is a major force moulding the development, structure and function of forests; and (b) that management of forests for all their benefits can be controlled so that the effects can be contained within those which result from natural by: This paper is a summary version of Cooper ().

He explains his idea about ponderosa pine regeneration pattern clearly. This is a good observational study. However, some of his statements in the paper were not tested, or at least results were not shown. For example, he said even-aged patches are a characteristic of P pine forests in the region.

Engelmann Spruce-Subalpine Fir (ESSF) forests of interior British Columbia have increasingly become the target of forest harvesting in the past 40 years. Over the past decade, increasing public concern over maintaining biodiversity and ecological health within forests has brought about two primary pieces of legislation—The Forest Practices Code of and The Forest.

In the River of No Return Wilderness in central Idaho, boreal owls use mixed conifer stands (39%), spruce-fir stands (25%), Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (18%), and quaking aspen stands (18%) for breeding territories.

Mexican spotted owls in the San Mateo Mountains of New Mexico showed a preference for greater density of large Rocky Mountain. An even-aged subalpine Abies lasiocarpa stand on the north slope below the summit suggests post-fire origin.

In the Pinaleno Mts. to the northeast, mixed conifer and spruce, fir forests complete the vegetation gradient typical of these southwest mountain by: The term "forest" encompasses an enormous diversity of forest types and structures.

The United States contains some of the most magnificent and biologically diverse forests of the world ().The particular kind of forest that occupies an area is determined by the interactions of several elements: the frequency and intensity of natural and anthropogenic disturbances, local.

In the central Rocky Mountains susceptibility to beetle attack can vary by location; the following sites are arranged from most to least susceptible: (1) trees in creek bottoms, (2) good stands on benches and high ridges, (3) poor stands on benches and high ridges, (4) mixed stands, and (5) immature stands (59,85).

Chapter 5: Fire in Western Forest Ecosystems Arno. stands tended to be uneven-aged and often contained some to year old trees (Arno and others b, ). Trees were often distributed in small even-aged clumps.

When small patches of overstory were killed by fire or bark beetles, subsequent fires consumed. Fire Regimes: In the northern Rocky Mountains, the results of a number of studies suggest two distinct fire regimes for stands with western larch as a seral dominant. On relatively dry sites, usually with Douglas-fir or Engelmann spruce as potential climax dominants, the natural fire regime was one of fairly short mean fire intervals of 20 to.

This ecological system occurs throughout the Rocky Mountains, south of Montana, on dry, rocky ridges and slopes near upper treeline above the matrix spruce-fir forest. It extends down to the lower montane in the northeastern Great Basin mountains where dominated by Pinus flexilis.

Sites are harsh, exposed to desiccating winds, with rocky.It was the first book length description of the PNT’s Practical and Ideal routes from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean.

The book owed its immediate success to a generation of activists who throughout the 's transformed the Trail from one person’s dream to .Southern red-backed vole, Clethrionomys gapperi, populations in relation to stand succession and old-growth character in the central Rocky Mountains.

Canadian Field-Naturalist Noss, R. F.

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